This 12" single was released in 1983 as an advance for Herbie Hancock's album FUTURE SHOCK, presenting its hit "Rockit." Even though the cover says that the track is featured in a "stretched version" (on the disc label, it's called the "long version"), this simply refers to the fact that there's also a three-minute edit of this track available. The version included here is exactly the same as the album version of this Grammy-winning song which propelled Hancock onto the charts, made Bill Laswell an "in" producer, became the unofficial anthem of the breakdance craze, and presented the turntable as a solo instrument for the very first time. Not to mention that the accompanying video is justly considered a classic.

The two tracks on the B-side are taken from Hancock's disco era: "You Bet Your Love" (from FEETS DON'T FAIL ME NOW, 1979) and "I Thought It Was You" (from SUNLIGHT, 1978), an earlier hit. While the merits of Hancock's disco recordings are rather controversial, there's a lot to be said in favor of them -- tight grooves, pioneering use of the Sennheiser vocoder, and (on the second track) kicking horn arrangements can be witnessed here. Still, both of these tracks are the album versions, which means that there's no real need to hunt this 12" single down.




This review was written for the All-Music Guide on February 6, 1999.

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Christian Genzel

Christian Genzel arbeitet als freier Autor und Filmschaffender. Sein erster Spielfilm DIE MUSE, ein Psychothriller mit Thomas Limpinsel und Henriette Müller, handelte von einem Schriftsteller, der eine junge Frau entführt, weil er sie als Inspiration für sein Buch braucht. Außerdem drehte Genzel mehrere Kurzfilme, darunter SCHLAFLOS, eine 40-minütige Liebeserklärung an die Musik mit Maximilian Simonischek und Stefan Murr. Derzeit entwickelt er seinen zweiten Spielfilm BROT UND SPIELE, eine Komödie mit Thomas Limpinsel, Götz Otto und Steffen Wink über alte Kindsköpfe und noch ältere Computerspiele, und dreht eine Dokumentation über den Filmemacher Howard Ziehm.

Christian Genzel schreibt außerdem in den Bereichen Film, TV und Musik, unter anderem für GMX, den All-Music Guide, das 35-Millimeter-Filmmagazin und Film & TV Kameramann. Außerdem hält er Vorträge zu Filmthemen und kuratierte 2014 an der Universität Salzburg eine Filmreihe zum Thema "Erster Weltkrieg".

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